Category Archives: Gay

Theatrical: ‘The Laramie Project’

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Last night I went to see ‘The Laramie Project’ – the final production by the students at the Gaiety School of Acting. Based on the 2000 play by Moisés Kaufman and the Tectonic Theater Project, about the reaction to the 1998 homophobic murder of gay University of Wyoming student Matthew Shepard in the small town of Laramie. The play draws on hundreds of interviews conducted by the theatre company with inhabitants of the town, journal entries, and published news reports. Last night ten actors portrayed more than sixty characters in a series of short scenes. Continue reading Theatrical: ‘The Laramie Project’

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Bookworm: ‘The Sparsholt Affair’ by Alan Hollinghurst

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‘The Sparsholt Affair’ by Alan Hollinghurst is his first book since 2011’s ‘The Stranger’s Child’ and his sixth overall. Having won the Man Booker Prize for his masterpiece ‘The Line of Beauty ‘ in 2005 the expectations every time he releases a book are high. His books are about the lives of gay men, but such is the beauty and power of his writing, they transcend that limiting categorization, and get placed in the General Fiction section of the bookshop. Continue reading Bookworm: ‘The Sparsholt Affair’ by Alan Hollinghurst

‘Labels are for bottles, not for people’. Oh Vomit.

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Happy Corporate Pride everyone. In the ever surreal landscape of life in the wastelands, my multinational employer is having a Pride day this week. I ought to be thankful that it is making an effort, but for some reason – despite my glued on smile – I find it quite bizarre. Thursday is ‘Rainbow’ day – a day where we are encouraged to wear our brightest clothes to ‘celebrate diversity’ and to ‘show our pride’. Hurrah. Yet I am not actually that celebratory. Such ungrateful behaviour on my part. Continue reading ‘Labels are for bottles, not for people’. Oh Vomit.

Showbiz trooper

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Friday evening was spent at the theatre – the final evening show for ‘25/The Decriminalisation Monologues’ at Outhouse.  Having written one of the monologues – ‘The Number’ –  I had found it very difficult to watch my own piece initially. I was feeling a touch self-conscious and insecure about it. Not by Friday however. I had gotten over my nerves and was able to sit back and enjoy the entire show. It was a privilege to be included in this project. It is important to remember how different this country was in the very recent past – how cold, hard and cruel it was to anyone who fell outside the boundaries of what was considered ‘normal’ by mainstream society. How it crushed many people. But how people resisted and pushed back, eventually transforming the social landscape. I hope there will be continued life in ‘The Decrminaliation Monologues’ as it gives an insight to young people  about those who fought, although their struggle is largely unknown to younger people. Continue reading Showbiz trooper

‘I’ve never seen you looking so lovely as you did tonight…’

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I shot up in my bed, and shivered. I couldn’t see my face, but if I had been able to, I suspect that I would have been as pale as a ghost. I glanced at the alarm clock of hatred, sitting on the bedside locker beside me. It was 3.30am. I felt relieved. I had another four hours left to sleep.

Staggering to the kitchen, I opened the cupboard and selected two of McVitie’s finest digestive biscuits. I was distressed and sweating. Some sugar would help. I don’t think the low blood sugars were the only cause for my concern however. The content of my dream had been most troubling.

The dream had involved a scenario in which the leader of North Korea – murderous dictator Kim-Jong Un –  had romantic designations on me, and wanted to make me his love slave. He had been chasing me through the rooms and dungeons of King John’s Castle in Limerick City, demanding that I requite his love. Continue reading ‘I’ve never seen you looking so lovely as you did tonight…’

Coming out? Nah. I’m staying in.

Yesterday was National Coming Out Day in the USA, some other countries, and online. I wasn’t aware of it – not being a very international day, I guess this is not a surprise.

Like many of these new-fangled web-based days of celebration (day of the sister; day of the brother etc. ) they are American creations, used as marketing gimmicks, for consumer goods and campaigns; and are very easy to promote through social media.

With my cynic’s hat on, I doubt that National Coming Out Day was celebrated with parades and parties in Saudi Arabia or Russia or Uganda.   Continue reading Coming out? Nah. I’m staying in.

Film review: ‘God’s own country’

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Johnny Saxby works on a farm in the Pennines in Yorkshire. His is a brutal existence –  a life of quiet desperation, living with his grandmother and father. Every night is spent binge drinking in the local pub. Every day is spent labouring on the farm by himself – his father’s stroke has rendered him unable to help with the gruelling manual work. Apart from drinking, his only other outlet is anonymous gay sex in trailers with trainee auctioneers at the local cattle mart. Bitter and disillusioned he lashes out at his old school friend, home from university for the weekend. His lonely life seems like a prison. Continue reading Film review: ‘God’s own country’

Gaze Film Festival: Documentaries


The August bank holiday weekend, also saw the 25th anniversary of  GAZE – the Irish LGBT film festival. Over forty films were screened – some old classics; films soon to be released in cinema; low budget films that exist thanks to the film festival circuit; short films and documentaries. The festival was held in the Lighthouse Cinema in Smithfield. Continue reading Gaze Film Festival: Documentaries